Medicines

Hydrocortisone Injection

It is used to treat symptoms of low corticosteroid levels (lack of certain substances that are usually produced by the body and are needed for normal body functioning). It is also used to treat severe allergic reactions. Hydrocortisone injection is used in the management of multiple sclerosis (a disease in which the nerves do not function properly), lupus (a disease in which the body attacks many of its own organs), gastrointestinal disease, and certain types of arthritis. Hydrocortisone injection is also used to treat certain conditions that affect the blood, skin, eyes, nervous system, thyroid, kidneys, and lungs. Hydrocortisone injection is in a class of medications called corticosteroids. It works to treat people with low levels of corticosteroids by replacing steroids that are normally produced naturally by the body. It also works to treat other conditions by reducing swelling and redness and by changing the way the immune system works.

How should this medicine be used?

Hydrocortisone injection comes as powder to be mixed with liquid to be injected intramuscularly (into a muscle) or intravenously (into a vein). Your dosing schedule will depend on your condition and on how you respond to treatment. You may receive hydrocortisone injection in a hospital or medical facility, or you may be given the medication to use at home. If you will be using hydrocortisone injection at home, your healthcare provider will show you how to inject the medication. Be sure that you understand these directions, and ask your healthcare provider if you have any questions. Ask your healthcare provider what to do if you have any problems using hydrocortisone injection. Your doctor may change your dose of hydrocortisone injection during your treatment to be sure that you are always using the lowest dose that works for you. Your doctor may also need to change your dose if you experience unusual stress on your body such as surgery, illness, or infection. Tell your doctor if your symptoms improve or get worse or if you get sick or have any changes in your health during your treatment.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before receiving hydrocortisone injection,
Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to hydrocortisone, any other medications, benzyl alcohol, or any of the ingredients in hydrocortisone injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients. Tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: aminoglutethimide (Cytadren; no longer available in U.S.); amphotericin B (Abelcet, Ambisome, Amphotec); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn) and selective COX-2 inhibitors such as celecoxib (Celebrex); carbamazepine (Equetro, Tegretol, Teril); cholinesterase inhibitors such as donepezil (Aricept, in Namzaric), galantamine (Razadyne), neostigmine (Bloxiverz), pyridostigmine (Mestinon, Regonol), and rivastigmine (Exelon); cholestyramine (Prevalite); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); medications for diabetes including insulin; digoxin (Lanoxin); diuretics ('water pills'); erythromycin (E.E.S., Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, others); estrogens including hormonal contraceptives (birth control pills, patches, rings, implants, and injections); isoniazid (Laniazid, Rifamate, in Rifater); ketoconazole (Nizoral, Xolegel); phenobarbital; phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); rifabutin (Mycobutin); and rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifamate, in Rifater). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects. Tell your doctor if you have a fungal infection (other than on your skin or nails). Your doctor will probably tell you not to use hydrocortisone injection. Also, tell your doctor if you have idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP; an ongoing condition that may cause easy bruising or bleeding due to an abnormally low number of platelets in the blood). Your doctor probably will not give you hydrocortisone intramuscularly, if you have ITP. Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had tuberculosis (TB: a type of lung infection); cataracts (clouding of the lens of the eye); glaucoma (an eye disease); Cushing's syndrome (condition where the body produces too much of the hormone cortisol); diabetes; high blood pressure; heart failure; a recent heart attack; emotional problems, depression or other types of mental illness; myasthenia gravis (a condition in which the muscles become weak); osteoporosis (condition in which the bones become weak and fragile and can break easily); seizures; ulcers; or liver, kidney, heart, intestinal, or thyroid disease. Also tell your doctor if you have any type of untreated bacterial, parasitic, or viral infection anywhere in your body or a herpes eye infection (a type of infection that causes a sore on the eyelid or eye surface). Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while receiving hydrocortisone injection, call your doctor. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are receiving hydrocortisone injection. do not have any vaccinations (shots to prevent diseases) without talking to your doctor. You should know that hydrocortisone injection may decrease your ability to fight infection and may prevent you from developing symptoms if you get an infection. Stay away from people who are sick and wash your hands often while you are using this medication. Be sure to avoid people who have chicken pox or measles. Call your doctor immediately if you think you may have been around someone who had chicken pox or measles..

What side effects can this medication cause?

Hydrocortisone injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:
Headache Dizziness Slowed healing of cuts and bruises Acne Thin, fragile, or dry skin Red or purple blotches or lines under the skin Skin depressions at the injection site Increased body fat or movement to different areas of your body Difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep Inappropriate happiness Extreme changes in mood changes in personality Extreme tiredness Depression increased sweating muscle weakness joint pain dizziness irregular or absent menstrual periods increased appetite hiccups
Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately:
sore throat, fever, chills, cough, or other signs of infection seizures vision problems swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs swelling or pain in the stomach difficulty breathing or swallowing shortness of breath sudden weight gain rash hives itching abnormal skin patches in the mouth, nose, or throat
Hydrocortisone injection may cause children to grow more slowly. Your child's doctor will watch your child's growth carefully while your child is using hydrocortisone injection. Talk to your child's doctor about the risks of giving this medication to your child. People who use hydrocortisone injection for a long time may develop glaucoma or cataracts. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using hydrocortisone injection and how often you should have your eyes examined during your treatment. Hydrocortisone injection may increase your risk of developing osteoporosis. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication. Hydrocortisone injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while using this medication..

Nifedipine

Why is this medication prescribed?

Nifedipine is used to treat high blood pressure and to control angina (chest pain). Nifedipine is in a class of medications called calcium-channel blockers. It lowers blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels so the heart does not have to pump as hard. It controls chest pain by increasing the supply of blood and oxygen to the heart.

High blood pressure is a common condition and when not treated, can cause damage to the brain, heart, blood vessels, kidneys and other parts of the body. Damage to these organs may cause heart disease, a heart attack, heart failure, stroke, kidney failure, loss of vision, and other problems. In addition to taking medication, making lifestyle changes will also help to control your blood pressure. These changes include eating a diet that is low in fat and salt, maintaining a healthy weight, exercising at least 30 minutes most days, not smoking, and using alcohol in moderation.

How should this medicine be used?

Nifedipine comes as a capsule and an extended-release (long-acting) tablet to take by mouth. The capsule is usually taken three or four times a day. The extended-release tablet should be taken once daily on an empty stomach, either 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal. To help you remember to take nifedipine, take it at around the same time(s) every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take nifedipine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Swallow the extended-release tablets whole; do not split, chew, or crush them.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of nifedipine and gradually increase your dose, generally once every 7 to 14 days.

If taken regularly, nifedipine controls chest pain, but it does not stop chest pain once it starts. Your doctor may prescribe a different medication to take when you have chest pain.

Nifedipine controls high blood pressure and chest pain (angina) but does not cure them. Continue to take nifedipine even if you feel well. Do not stop taking nifedipine without talking to your doctor. Your

will probably decrease your dose gradually.

Other uses for this medicine

Nifedipine is also used sometimes to treat preterm labor and Raynaud's syndrome. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking nifedipine,

Tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to nifedipine, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in nifedipine. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.

Tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: acarbose (Precose); anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); antifungals such as fluconazole (Diflucan), itraconazole (Onmel, Sporanox), and ketoconazole (Nizoral); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), propranolol (Inderal, Innopran, in Inderide), and timolol ); carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Epitol, Tegretol); cimetidine (Tagamet); digoxin (Lanoxin); diltiazem (Cardizem); doxazosin (Cardura); erythromycin (E.E.S., E-Mycin, Erythrocin); fentanyl (Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora); flecainide (Tambocor); HIV protease inhibitors including amprenavir (Agenerase), atazanavir (Reyataz), delavirdine (Rescriptor), fosamprenavir (Lexiva), indinavir (Crixivan), nelfinavir (Viracept), and ritonavir (Norvir, in Kaletra); metformin (Glucophage); nefazodone; phenobarbital; phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); quinidine (in Nuedexta); quinupristin and dalfopristin (Synercid); rifampin (Rifadin, in Rifamate, in Rifater, Rimactane); rifapentine (Priftin); tacrolimus (Astagraf SL,Prograf); valproic acid (Depakene); and verapamil (Calan, Covera, Verelan, in Tarka). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.

Tell your doctor what herbal products you are taking, especially St. John's wort.

Tell your doctor if you have or have ever had a narrowing or blockage of your digestive system or any other condition that causes food to move through your digestive system more slowly; or heart, liver, or kidney disease. Also tell your doctor if you have had a myocardial infarction (MI) within the last 2 weeks.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking nifedipine, call your doctor.

Talk to your doctor about the safe use of nifedipine capsules if you are 65 years of age or older. Older adults should not usually take nifedipine capsules because they are not as safe as other medications that can be used to treat the same condition.

If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell your doctor or dentist that you are taking nifedipine.

Ask your doctor about the safe use of alcoholic beverages while you are taking nifedipine. Alcohol can make the side effects from nifedipine worse.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Do not drink grapefruit juice or eat grapefruit 3 days before and while taking nifedipine.

If your doctor prescribes a low-salt or low-sodium diet, follow these directions carefully.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Nifedipine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

headache

nausea

dizziness or lightheadedness

flushing

heartburn

fast heartbeat

muscle cramps

constipation

cough

decreased sexual ability

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment:

swelling of the face, eyes, lips, tongue, hands, arms, feet, ankles, or lower legs

difficulty breathing or swallowing

fainting

rash

yellowing of the skin or eyes

increase in frequency or severity of chest pain (angina)

 

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature, away from light, and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight.

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community.

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your blood pressure should be checked regularly to determine your response to nifedipine.

If you are taking certain extended-release tablets (Afeditab CR, Procardia XL), you may notice something that looks like a tablet in your stool. This is just the empty tablet shell, and this does not mean that you did not get your complete dose of medication.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Penicillin G Procaine

Why is this medication prescribed?

Penicillin G procaine injection is used to treat certain infections caused by bacteria. Penicillin G procaine injection should not be used to treat gonorrhea (a sexually transmitted disease) or early in the treatment of certain serious infections. Penicillin G procaine injection is in a class of medications called penicillins. It works by killing bacteria that cause infections.

Antibiotics such as penicillin G procaine injection will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. Taking antibiotics when they are not needed increases your risk of getting an infection later that resists antibiotic treatment.

How should this medicine be used?

Penicillin G procaine injection comes as a suspension (liquid) in a prefilled syringe to inject into the muscles of the buttocks or thigh by a doctor or nurse in a medical facility. It is usually given once a day. The length of your treatment depends on the type of infection that you have and how well you respond to the medication.

You should begin to feel better during the first few days of treatment with penicillin G procaine injection. If your symptoms do not improve or get worse, call your doctor.

Be sure to keep all appointments to receive penicillin G procaine injection on schedule even if you feel better. If you stop receiving penicillin G procaine injection too soon or skip doses, your infection may not be completely treated and the bacteria may become resistant to antibiotics.

You may experience a sudden severe reaction immediately after receiving a dose of penicillin G procaine injection that may last for approximately 15 to 30 minutes. Tell your doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms right after your injection: anxiety, confusion, agitation, depression, weakness, seizures, seeing things or hearing voices that do not exist, aggressive behavior, and fear of dying.

Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before receiving penicillin G procaine injection,

tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to penicillin G procaine injection, penicillin antibiotics; cephalosporin antibiotics such as cefaclor, cefadroxil, cefazolin (Ancef, Kefzol), cefditoren (Spectracef), cefepime (Maxipime), cefixime (Suprax), cefotaxime (Claforan), cefoxitin, cefpodoxime, cefprozil, ceftazidime (Fortaz, Tazicef), ceftibuten (Cedax), ceftriaxone (Rocephin), cefuroxime (Ceftin, Zinacef), and cephalexin (Keflex); procaine; or any other medications. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure if a medication you are allergic to belongs to one of these groups of medications. Also tell your doctor if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in penicillin G procaine injection. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.

tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention: probenecid (Probalan) and tetracycline (Achromycin). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.

tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, allergies, hay fever, hives, or kidney disease.

tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. If you become pregnant while receiving penicillin G procaine injection, call your doctor.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

If you miss an appointment to receive penicillin G procaine injection, call your doctor as soon as possible.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Penicillin G procaine injection may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

nausea

vomiting

pain, swelling, lump, bleeding, or bruising in the area where the medication was injected

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately or get emergency medical treatment:

rash

hives

itching

difficulty breathing or swallowing

swelling of the face, throat, tongue, lips, eyes, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs

hoarseness

sore throat

chills

fever

headache

muscle or joint pain

weakness

fast heartbeat

severe diarrhea (watery or bloody stools) with or without fever and stomach cramps that may occur up to 2 months or more after your treatment

sudden onset of lower back pain, muscle weakness, numbness, and tingling

blue or black skin discoloration in the area where the medication was injected

skin blistering, peeling, or shedding in the area where the medication was injected

numbness of the arms or legs in the area where the medication was injected

Penicillin G procaine injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while receiving this medication.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

twitching

seizures

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your body's response to penicillin G procaine injection.

Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about penicillin G procaine injection.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Other names

APPG

Benzylpenicillin Procaine

Procaine Penicillin G

Living with Excessive Sweating

Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that occurs even when the temperature isn't hot and you're not exercising. In some people who have hyperhidrosis, the sweat literally drips off their hands. Hyperhidrosis usually affects the palms of the hands, soles of the feet and underarms. Besides disrupting normal daily activities, hyperhidrosis can cause social anxiety or embarrassment.

Lifestyle and Home remedies for Hyperhidrosis

In addition to over-the-counter antiperspirants, the following suggestions may help you reduce sweating and the associated body odor:

  • Bathe daily. Regular bathing helps keep the number of bacteria on your skin in check.
  • Dry your feet thoroughly after you bathe. Microorganisms thrive in the damp spaces between your toes. Use over-the-counter foot powders to help absorb sweat.
  • Choose shoes and socks made of natural materials. Shoes made of natural materials, such as leather, can help prevent sweaty feet by allowing your feet to breathe.
  • Rotate your shoes. Shoes won't completely dry overnight, so try not to wear the same pair two days in a row.
  • Wear the right socks. Cotton and wool socks help keep your feet dry because they absorb moisture. When you're active, moisture-winking athletic socks are a good choice.
  • Change your socks often. Change socks or hose once or twice a day, drying your feet thoroughly each time. Women may prefer pantyhose with cotton soles. Air your feet. Go barefoot when you can, or at least slip out of your shoes now and then.

Choose natural-fiber clothing. Wear natural fabrics, such as cotton, wool and silk, which allow your skin to breathe. When you exercise, you might prefer high-tech fabrics that wick moisture away from your skin.

Try relaxation techniques. Consider relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation or biofeedback. These can help you learn to control the stress that triggers perspiration.

Coping and Support for Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis can be distressing. You may have trouble working or enjoying recreational activities because of wet hands or feet or wet stains on clothing. You might feel embarrassed or anxious about your symptoms and become withdrawn or self-consciousness. You may be frustrated or upset by other people's reactions. Besides talking to your doctor, you may want to talk to a counselor or medical social worker. Or you may find it helpful to talk to other people with hyperhidrosis. Go online to connect with other people living with the condition.

Read More

Living with Epilepsy

Understanding your epilepsy condition can help you take better control of it. And to the people who stay with the affected individuals, giving them care and support in their time of need is always the best therapy.

Lifestyle and Home Remedies for Epilepsy

Take your medication correctly. Don’t adjust your dosage before talking to your doctor. If you feel your medication should be changed, discuss it with your doctor. Get enough sleep. Lack of sleep can trigger seizures. Be sure to get adequate rest every night. Wear a medical alert bracelet. This will help emergency personnel know how to treat you correctly. Exercise. Exercising may help keep you physically healthy and reduce depression. Make sure to drink enough water, and rest if you get tired during exercise. In addition, make healthy life choices, such as managing stress, limiting alcoholic beverages and avoiding cigarettes.

Coping and support

Uncontrolled seizures and their effects on your life may at times feel overwhelming or lead to depression. It’s important not to let epilepsy hold you back. You can still live an active, full life. To help cope: Educate yourself and your friends and family about epilepsy so that they understand the condition. Try to ignore negative reactions from people. It helps to learn about epilepsy so that you know the facts as opposed to misconceptions about the disease. And try to keep your sense of humor. Live as independently as possible. Continue to work, if possible. If you can’t drive because of your seizures, investigate public transportation options near you. If you aren’t allowed to drive, you might consider moving to a city with good public transportation options. Find a doctor you like and with whom you feel comfortable. Try not to constantly worry about having a seizure. Find an epilepsy support group to meet people who understand what you’re going through. If your seizures are so severe that you can’t work outside your home, there are still ways to feel productive and connected to people. You may consider working from home. Let people you work and live with know the correct way to handle a seizure in case they are with you when you have one. You may offer them suggestions, such as: Carefully roll the person onto one side to prevent choking. Place something soft under his or her head. Loosen tight neckwear. Don’t try to put your fingers or anything else in the person’s mouth. No one has ever “swallowed” his or her tongue during a seizure — it’s physically impossible. Don’t try to restrain someone having a seizure. If the person is moving, clear away dangerous objects. Stay with the person until medical personnel arrive. Observe the person closely so that you can provide details on what happened. Time the seizures. Be calm during the seizures.

Betting Addiction

Compulsive gambling, also called gambling disorder, is the uncontrollable urge to keep gambling despite the toll it takes on your life. Gambling/ Betting means that you're willing to risk something you value in the hope of getting something of even greater value. Gambling can stimulate the brain's reward system much like drugs such as alcohol can, leading to addiction. If you're prone to compulsive gambling, you may continually chase bets, hide your behavior, deplete savings, accumulate debt, or even resort to theft or fraud to support your addiction

Lifestyle and Home Remedies

There's no proven way to prevent a gambling problem from occurring or recurring. If you have risk factors for compulsive gambling, it may be helpful to avoid gambling in any form, people who gamble and places where gambling occurs. Get treatment at the earliest sign of a problem to help prevent a gambling disorder from becoming worse.

Coping and Support for Betting

The appeal of gambling is hard to overcome if you keep thinking that you'll win the next time you gamble. These recovery skills may help you remain focused on resisting the urges of compulsive gambling: -Tell yourself it's too risky to gamble at all. One bet typically leads to another and another. -Give yourself permission to ask for help, as part of realizing that sheer willpower isn't enough to overcome compulsive gambling. Ask a family member or friend to encourage you to follow your treatment plan. -Stay focused on your No. 1 goal: not to gamble. Coping skills to better manage the other issues in your life can be initiated only when you aren't gambling. -Recognize and then avoid situations that trigger your urge to bet. -Family members of compulsive gamblers can get counseling, even if the gambler is unwilling to participate in therapy.