Archives April 2023

Living with Excessive Sweating

Hyperhidrosis is excessive sweating that occurs even when the temperature isn't hot and you're not exercising. In some people who have hyperhidrosis, the sweat literally drips off their hands. Hyperhidrosis usually affects the palms of the hands, soles of the feet and underarms. Besides disrupting normal daily activities, hyperhidrosis can cause social anxiety or embarrassment.

Lifestyle and Home remedies for Hyperhidrosis

In addition to over-the-counter antiperspirants, the following suggestions may help you reduce sweating and the associated body odor:

  • Bathe daily. Regular bathing helps keep the number of bacteria on your skin in check.
  • Dry your feet thoroughly after you bathe. Microorganisms thrive in the damp spaces between your toes. Use over-the-counter foot powders to help absorb sweat.
  • Choose shoes and socks made of natural materials. Shoes made of natural materials, such as leather, can help prevent sweaty feet by allowing your feet to breathe.
  • Rotate your shoes. Shoes won't completely dry overnight, so try not to wear the same pair two days in a row.
  • Wear the right socks. Cotton and wool socks help keep your feet dry because they absorb moisture. When you're active, moisture-winking athletic socks are a good choice.
  • Change your socks often. Change socks or hose once or twice a day, drying your feet thoroughly each time. Women may prefer pantyhose with cotton soles. Air your feet. Go barefoot when you can, or at least slip out of your shoes now and then.

Choose natural-fiber clothing. Wear natural fabrics, such as cotton, wool and silk, which allow your skin to breathe. When you exercise, you might prefer high-tech fabrics that wick moisture away from your skin.

Try relaxation techniques. Consider relaxation techniques such as yoga, meditation or biofeedback. These can help you learn to control the stress that triggers perspiration.

Coping and Support for Hyperhidrosis

Hyperhidrosis can be distressing. You may have trouble working or enjoying recreational activities because of wet hands or feet or wet stains on clothing. You might feel embarrassed or anxious about your symptoms and become withdrawn or self-consciousness. You may be frustrated or upset by other people's reactions. Besides talking to your doctor, you may want to talk to a counselor or medical social worker. Or you may find it helpful to talk to other people with hyperhidrosis. Go online to connect with other people living with the condition.

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Living with Epilepsy

Understanding your epilepsy condition can help you take better control of it. And to the people who stay with the affected individuals, giving them care and support in their time of need is always the best therapy.

Lifestyle and Home Remedies for Epilepsy

Take your medication correctly. Don’t adjust your dosage before talking to your doctor. If you feel your medication should be changed, discuss it with your doctor. Get enough sleep. Lack of sleep can trigger seizures. Be sure to get adequate rest every night. Wear a medical alert bracelet. This will help emergency personnel know how to treat you correctly. Exercise. Exercising may help keep you physically healthy and reduce depression. Make sure to drink enough water, and rest if you get tired during exercise. In addition, make healthy life choices, such as managing stress, limiting alcoholic beverages and avoiding cigarettes.

Coping and support

Uncontrolled seizures and their effects on your life may at times feel overwhelming or lead to depression. It’s important not to let epilepsy hold you back. You can still live an active, full life. To help cope: Educate yourself and your friends and family about epilepsy so that they understand the condition. Try to ignore negative reactions from people. It helps to learn about epilepsy so that you know the facts as opposed to misconceptions about the disease. And try to keep your sense of humor. Live as independently as possible. Continue to work, if possible. If you can’t drive because of your seizures, investigate public transportation options near you. If you aren’t allowed to drive, you might consider moving to a city with good public transportation options. Find a doctor you like and with whom you feel comfortable. Try not to constantly worry about having a seizure. Find an epilepsy support group to meet people who understand what you’re going through. If your seizures are so severe that you can’t work outside your home, there are still ways to feel productive and connected to people. You may consider working from home. Let people you work and live with know the correct way to handle a seizure in case they are with you when you have one. You may offer them suggestions, such as: Carefully roll the person onto one side to prevent choking. Place something soft under his or her head. Loosen tight neckwear. Don’t try to put your fingers or anything else in the person’s mouth. No one has ever “swallowed” his or her tongue during a seizure — it’s physically impossible. Don’t try to restrain someone having a seizure. If the person is moving, clear away dangerous objects. Stay with the person until medical personnel arrive. Observe the person closely so that you can provide details on what happened. Time the seizures. Be calm during the seizures.

Betting Addiction

Compulsive gambling, also called gambling disorder, is the uncontrollable urge to keep gambling despite the toll it takes on your life. Gambling/ Betting means that you're willing to risk something you value in the hope of getting something of even greater value. Gambling can stimulate the brain's reward system much like drugs such as alcohol can, leading to addiction. If you're prone to compulsive gambling, you may continually chase bets, hide your behavior, deplete savings, accumulate debt, or even resort to theft or fraud to support your addiction

Lifestyle and Home Remedies

There's no proven way to prevent a gambling problem from occurring or recurring. If you have risk factors for compulsive gambling, it may be helpful to avoid gambling in any form, people who gamble and places where gambling occurs. Get treatment at the earliest sign of a problem to help prevent a gambling disorder from becoming worse.

Coping and Support for Betting

The appeal of gambling is hard to overcome if you keep thinking that you'll win the next time you gamble. These recovery skills may help you remain focused on resisting the urges of compulsive gambling: -Tell yourself it's too risky to gamble at all. One bet typically leads to another and another. -Give yourself permission to ask for help, as part of realizing that sheer willpower isn't enough to overcome compulsive gambling. Ask a family member or friend to encourage you to follow your treatment plan. -Stay focused on your No. 1 goal: not to gamble. Coping skills to better manage the other issues in your life can be initiated only when you aren't gambling. -Recognize and then avoid situations that trigger your urge to bet. -Family members of compulsive gamblers can get counseling, even if the gambler is unwilling to participate in therapy.
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